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Peruvian History
Peruvian Food Dictionary
 
 
 

 

Peruvian Food Dictionary
Ceviche (suh-vee-chey): Derived from the term "siwichi" in Quechua (Inca Language). Originated in either Peru or Ecuador and spread throughout Latin America. It is usually it is made with fish and citrus, but there are many variations. Ceviche is a favored dish in many fine dinning restaurants all over the world. Ceviche (suh-vee-chey) : Derived from the term "siwichi" in Quechua (Inca language). It originated in either Peru or Ecuador and spread throughout Latin America. It is usually made with fish and citrus, but there are many variations. Ceviche is a favored dish in many fine dinning restaurants all over the world.
Choclo : Peruvian corn with large tender kernels that is light yellow in color. Recent evidence has been found in the Cotahuasi Valley of southern Peru that the people have been cultivation corn in the area for nearly 4,000 years. It is not only a staple food, but a common ingredient in the beer known as chicha. Choclo : Peruvian corn with large tender kernels that is light yellow in color. Recent evidence has been found in the Cotahuasi Valley of Southern Peru that the people have been cultivating corn in the area for nearly 4,000 years. Choclo is not only a staple food, but a common ingredient in the beer known as chicha.
Palta:  Quechua name for Avocado. Their seeds have been found with mummies dating back to 750 B.C.
Palta : Quechua name for avocado. It's seeds have been found with mummies dating back to 750 B.C.
Rocoto: A pepper commonly used in Peru and is one of the oldest domesticated Peppers (3000 B.C.). Rocoto : A pepper commonly used in Peru and one of the oldest domesticated peppers (3000 B.C.).
Tiradito: Similar to Ceviche, but differs in cut and presentation. The fish is sliced into fine, long pieces, without onions. The evolution of the dish has likely has been influenced by the Japanese immigration into Peru during the late 1800’s.
Tiradito : Similar to Ceviche, but differs in cut and presentation. The fish is sliced into fine, long pieces, without onions. The evolution of the dish has likely been influenced by the Japanese immigration into Peru during the late 1800’s.
   

 

 




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